Performers

The Richmond Folk Festival is now one of Virginia’s largest and most anticipated events of the year. The Festival strives to present the very finest traditional artists from across the nation. In making its selections, a local Programming Committee is guided by the following definition, which is the guide for the National Council for Traditional Arts and the National Folk Festival, as well as the National Endowment for the Arts:

FOLK & TRADITIONAL ARTS – a definition
The folk and traditional arts are rooted in and reflective of the cultural life of a community. Community members may share a common ethnic heritage, language, religion, occupation, or geographic region. These vital and constantly reinvigorated artistic traditions are shaped by values and standards of excellence that are passed from generation to generation, most often within family and community, through demonstration, conversation, and practice. Genres of artistic activity include, but are not limited to, music, dance, crafts, and oral expression.
- National Endowment for the Arts

Interested in performing at the 2017 Richmond Folk Festival?

Programming discussions take place from November to May with most programming decisions complete by June 1st prior to this year's festivals. All artists must follow the same process. If you're interested in applying for the 2017 festival, check out "How to be a performer at the Richmond Folk Festival"


Performers for the 2017 Richmond Folk Festival

Be’la Dona

Be’la Dona

go-go
The DMV

When the nine ladies of Be’la Dona hit the stage, they bring with them a wealth of individual musical experience: classical training of the highest caliber, weekly musical ministry in church, and years of work backing leading national artists ranging from Nile Rogers to Erykah Badu to Salt-N-Pepa. Together, they form one of the hottest bands playing D.C.’s best-known musical product, the unstoppable party music known as go-go.

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Betsayda Machado y La Parranda El Clavo

Betsayda Machado y La Parranda El Clavo

Afro-Venezuelan parranda
El Clavo and Caracas, Venezuela

La Parranda El Clavo and their clarion-voiced leader Betsayda Machado have inspired international acclaim for the exuberant sounds of their Afro-Venezuelan heritage. The New York Times declared them “the kind of group that world-music fans have always been thrilled to discover: vital, accomplished, local, unplugged, deeply rooted.”

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Bitori feat. Chando Graciosa

Bitori feat. Chando Graciosa

Cabo Verdean funaná
Praia, Santiago Island, Cabo Verde

Richmond audiences have a rare opportunity to see a legend of Cabo Verdean funaná at this year’s festival. While the nostalgic morna of the northern islands, Cabo Verde’s best-known genre, is played throughout the archipelago, the joyful, insurgent sound of accordion-based funaná is unique to Santiago Island in the south. Santiago is also the birthplace of accordion player Victor Tavares, better known as Bitori. Now an elder statesman of funaná, Bitori is finally receiving recognition for his central role in preserving the music that, as singer Chando Graciosa says, “represents the citizens of Cabo Verde, who are defined not by what they own but by what keeps them going: Hope.”

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C.J. Chenier & the Red Hot Louisiana Band

C.J. Chenier & the Red Hot Louisiana Band

zydeco
Houston, Texas

C.J. Chenier is “the true royal successor” of his pioneering father, the King of Zydeco, Clifton Chenier. Like his father Clifton before him, C.J. Chenier embraces the zydeco imperative to laissez les bon temps rouler: “Our main goal,” he declares, “is happy feet and happy faces.”

 

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Corazón de Granada: Flamenco Joven y Jondo

Corazón de Granada: Flamenco Joven y Jondo

flamenco
Granada, Spain

Although the historic city of Granada in Spain’s southern autonomous region of Andalucia is home to the famed Alhambra palace and the cave dwellings of the Sacromonte, it is perhaps best known for its impassioned flamenco culture. The three artists of Corazón de Granada: Flamenco Joven y Jondo have a name that acknowledges their youth in a tradition that often prioritizes a lifetime of mastery (joven means “young”) but also asserts their deep (jondo) dedication to flamenco, indeed the heart (corazón) of Granada.

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Crooked Road Ramblers

Crooked Road Ramblers

old-time
southwest Virginia

Like their namesake The Crooked Road, southwest Virginia’s 333-mile long “heritage music trail,” the Crooked Road Ramblers take listeners on a journey into the Blue Ridge region’s rich heritage of old-time music. The Crooked Road Ramblers came together in 2004 through the efforts of then-22-year-old Kilby Spencer, who “started the band in hopes of carrying on the driving southwest Virginia ‘big’ band sound that makes people want to dance.” This desire to keep old-time music vital comes naturally to Kilby, a member of Whitetop Mountain's Spencer family, renowned for their commitment to continuing the region’s musical traditions.

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Dale Ann Bradley

Dale Ann Bradley

bluegrass
Middlesboro, Kentucky

A five-time winner of the International Bluegrass Music Association’s (IBMA) Female Vocalist of the Year award, Dale Ann Bradley is acknowledged as one of bluegrass music’s greatest contemporary singers, with a pure, shimmering soprano that brings alive the stories she sings. Though she has established a successful Nashville music career, she stays true to her Appalachian roots, with deft guitar picking, gospel-inspired harmonies, and “nothing doctored up” personal songwriting that bring listeners to the heart of bluegrass music.

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Don Bryant

Don Bryant

Memphis soul
Memphis, Tennessee 

Memphis has long been a crucible for uniquely American sounds, from Beale Street blues to Sun Studios rockabilly. The Memphis sound—a less hard-edged regional manifestation of soul—and its main studios, Stax and Hi, launched the careers of scores of legendary performers. During the heyday of Memphis soul, Don Bryant was best known as a songwriter, but he recently released his first album in nearly four decades, at 75 years young, bringing much deserved attention to his central place in the pantheon of great Memphis soul singers.

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Eddie Cotton, Jr.

Eddie Cotton, Jr.

soul blues
Clinton, Mississippi

Bluesman Eddie Cotton, Jr.’s music is rooted in the church. His father was a Pentecostal minister, shepherding the Christ Chapel Church of God in Christ that he founded in Clinton, Mississippi, just west of Jackson. While music was central to church services, his family and his congregation shunned secular music. Nonetheless, Cotton reflects, “The deepest of the blues I’ve ever played is in church.… The style they play on is nothing but blues.”

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Grand Master Seiichi Tanaka & the San Francisco Taiko Dojo

Grand Master Seiichi Tanaka & the San Francisco Taiko Dojo

Japanese taiko drumming
San Francisco, California

Seiichi Tanaka is a Grand Master of the ancient Japanese form of ritual drumming known as taiko. Taiko combines percussive sound with physically demanding choreographic movement to create a mesmerizing musical performance. “Teaching the discipline of mind and body, in the spirit of complete respect and unity among the drummers, that is my policy,” says Sensei Tanaka. “Heart, skill, physical strength, and courtesy—these four elements are based on Japanese martial arts. I have the same philosophy for my taiko.”

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The Green Fields of America

The Green Fields of America

Irish
East Coast of the U.S.

Four decades ago, renowned musician and folklorist Mick Moloney gathered some of the finest Irish American musicians and dancers to perform at the Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife. Overwhelming interest in that program led Moloney and friends to form The Green Fields of America, the first group on either side of the Atlantic to bring together Irish vocal, instrumental, and dance traditions on the concert stage, sparking a renaissance that continues to this day. The group’s ever-changing lineup draws on the legacy of immigrant musicians who created a rich new repertoire in America out of diverse traditions from across the Emerald Isle. As Moloney says, “The personnel has changed but the concept has remained constant over the past 30 years: to show in one major ensemble some of Irish America's finest musicians and dancers.”

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Hot Club of Cowtown

Hot Club of Cowtown

western swing and hot jazz
Austin, Texas

As its name implies, the Hot Club of Cowtown pays homage to two legendary groups from the 1930s: the swinging guitar and violin of Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli’s Hot Club of Paris, decamped from that city to the territory of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys. Now celebrating 20 years together, the Hot Club of Cowtown is widely recognized as one of the finest ensembles in western swing and hot jazz today.

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Innov Gnawa

Innov Gnawa

Moroccan Gnawa
Brooklyn, New York

This Brooklyn-based sextet, led by Maâlem Hassan Ben Jafeer, envelops audiences in the trance-inducing sounds of the Moroccan Gnawa tradition, a pre-Islamic music associated with Sufi mysticism. Guided by a maâlem, a master artist vested with deep spiritual responsibility, musicians perform elaborately structured all-night trance rituals (lila) to engage the spirits in the healing and purification of both individuals and community. While historically a culture of the dispossessed, Gnawa has in recent years gained immense popularity in Morocco as a national symbol.

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Jan Knutson

Jan Knutson

jazz guitar
Berwyn Heights, Maryland

Only days before he performs at the Richmond Folk Festival, Jan Knutson will turn 19. But the tunes this young musician plays with such virtuosity and subtlety express the history of American vernacular guitar traditions. Knutson’s repertoire draws from the Great American Songbook, Gypsy jazz, and jazz’s heritage of guitar improvisation. Such is the level of skill he exhibits that his mentor, the guitar master Frank Vignola, says Knutson “is destined to be one of the next generation’s great guitarists."

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Los Wembler’s

Los Wembler’s

cumbia amazonica
Iquitos, Peru

Los Wembler’s come from Iquitos, a city of half a million people in the heart of the Amazon, the largest city in the world that is completely inaccessible by road. As the band says, Iquitos can only be reached by boat, by plane—or by radio waves. And like the city they call home, the music Los Wembler’s pioneered nearly 50 years ago is deeply rooted in the sounds and rhythms of the Amazon and yet full of unexpected connections to the currents of international music.

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Nicolae Feraru

Nicolae Feraru

Romanian cimbalom
Chicago, Illinois

Nicolae Feraru is a revered musical master in Chicago’s Romanian and Hungarian immigrant communities, who, in 2013, received a National Heritage Fellowship, the nation’s highest honor for traditional artists. Now 67, he retains the same undiminished love of the cimbalom (hammered dulcimer) that he exhibited as a child, when he ate bread while practicing so as not to waste time on meals. “The music, this is my life,” says Feraru.

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Patti Kusturok

Patti Kusturok

Métis fiddle and dance
Winnipeg, Manitoba

One of Canada’s best-known fiddle teachers has said of Winnipeg’s Patti Kusturok: “When it comes to old-time fiddling in Canada, Patti’s the ‘Boss.’” Indeed, Patti is a lauded master of Canadian fiddle playing, and it is the unique Métis fiddling tradition that forms the core of her repertoire. This tradition has for centuries been a central element of Métis cultural identity in Western Canada and the Northern Plains. The fiddle is the essential instrument in this tradition, whose notable characteristics include fast tempos with asymmetric phrasing, double-stringing, altered fiddle tunings—and the clogging that often accompanies a well-played tune.

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Paulin Brothers Brass Band

Paulin Brothers' Brass Band

New Orleans brass band
New Orleans, Louisiana

The Paulin Brothers' Brass Band carries on the venerable legacy of their father, the late Ernest “Doc” Paulin. Doc Paulin’s Dixieland Jazz Band was beloved in New Orleans for seven decades. Traditional New Orleans jazz embodies the creolized culture of that city, combining African, European, and Caribbean musical aesthetics into a distinctly American sound. The music had two birthplaces: the club and the street parade. Whatever the setting, Doc Paulin's band approached the music with a discipline and verve that made them a touchstone of New Orleans jazz. He mentored countless younger musicians, including his sons, who champion his memory and the jazz band tradition.

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Sahba Motallebi

Sahba Motallebi

Persian tar
Los Angeles, California

Sahba Motallebi is recognized internationally as a modern virtuoso of the tar and setar, lute-like stringed instruments central to one of the world’s great musical traditions and one of its oldest. Rooted in prehistory and developing over millennia, Persian classical music is a deeply spiritual and contemplative art form that began as court music, but became central to Iranian identity in the early 1900s.

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Spencer Taylor & the Highway QC’s

Spencer Taylor & the Highway QC’s

gospel
Washington, D.C.

For over 70 years, the Highway QC’s have been one of the top gospel groups in the classic “quartet” tradition. Sam Cooke, Lou Rawls, and Johnnie Taylor began their careers in the QC’s, each taking their turn as bandleader, before crossing over to become R&B stars. But under the direction of their fourth and current leader, Spencer Taylor, Jr., the QC’s stayed the course, recording groundbreaking male-harmony records and singing the sacred sounds of gospel all over the world.

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A Step Ahead

A Step Ahead

step team competition
central Virginia

Among the most vital and exciting manifestations of long-practiced traditions on college campuses are the “step shows” organized by African American sororities and fraternities, known as Black Greek-Letter Organizations (BGLOs). Whether informal displays of pride and skill “on the yard,” or formalized competitions before thousands of fans, “stepping” celebrates African American culture, and highlights the contributions that BGLOs make to campus and community life.

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The U.S. Army Blues

The U.S. Army Blues

classic big band jazz
Washington, D.C.

As part of the ongoing observance of the 75th anniversary of World War II, the Richmond Folk Festival is proud to present the U.S. Army Blues, an acclaimed military ensemble that carries on the American big band tradition with both precision and style. This 18-member jazz ensemble is one of 10 musical groups that make up the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own.” General John “Black Jack” Pershing founded the U.S. Army Band in 1922, inspired by the example of European military bands active during the First World War. The Army Blues became an official division of “Pershing’s Own” in 1972, carrying on a jazz legacy begun by the Army Dance Band that entertained in war zones during World War II.

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Patti Kusturok

Wayne Hancock

honky-tonk
Denton, Texas

“Wayne Hancock has more Hank Sr. in him than either I or Hank Jr. He’s the real deal,” declares frequent Hancock collaborator Hank Williams III. That’s the kind of no-nonsense assessment that makes Wayne “The Train” Hancock a legend to devotees of honky-tonk music.

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In the Classroom

Through the generous support of its sponsors, the Richmond Folk Festival will fill Richmond area school auditoriums and classrooms with performances and presentations of deeply-rooted cultural expressions.
 
The week prior to the festival, master musicians and artists visit several area schools. Together, the artists and students share music, song, craft, stories and memories that will last a lifetime.

Artists and schools will be announced in September.