Film Fest

National Park Service Civil War Visitors Center

2018 Richmond Folk Festival Documentary Film Series Schedule

The 2018 Richmond Folk Festival Documentary Film Series celebrates the richness and diversity of our national parks. This year's film series highlights parks that protect and preserve America’s cultural and historical treasures. From Fort McHenry to Andersonville, San Antonio Missions to Valley Forge, and many parks in between, viewers will learn about the incredible places associated with key moments in our nation’s history.

Film screenings will take place in the National Park Service Civil War Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works, located at the center of the festival site, throughout the day on Saturday and Sunday. All films are approximately 20 minutes long unless otherwise noted.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

12:00 p.m. Richmond National Battlefield Park – The capital and hub of the Confederacy, the fate of Richmond would determine the fate of the American South during the Civil War. Today 13 distinct sites comprise the park, each one a reminder of a war that defined the nation.

12:30 p.m. Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site – Maggie Lena Walker devoted her life to civil rights, economic empowerment, and educational opportunities for Jim Crow-era African Americans and women. Today, her home is preserved as a tribute to her enduring legacy of vision, courage, and determination.

1:00 p.m. Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site (60 min.) – The story of Brown v. Board of Education, which ended legal segregation in public schools, is one of hope and courage. The site commemorates one of the Topeka, Kansas, schools impacted by this landmark decision.

2:00 p.m. Fort Stanwix National Monument – For centuries, a six-mile portage connecting the Mohawk River and Wood Creek in New York served as a link for those traveling by water from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes. When Europeans arrived, nations fought for control of it, and Fort Stanwix played a vital role in that struggle.

2:30 p.m. Appomattox Court House National Historical Park – On April 9, 1865, the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia in the McLean House in the village of Appomattox Court House, Virginia, signaled the end of the nation’s largest war, but significant questions remained. How did this sleepy community find itself at the center of the war’s end?

3:00 p.m. Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine (12 min.) – The valiant defense of this star-shaped fort during the Battle of Baltimore in 1814 helped to confirm American independence from Britain and inspired Francis Scott Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

 3:30 p.m. Morristown National Historical Park – The park commemorates the sites of General Washington and the Continental Army’s winter encampment of December 1779 to June 1780, where they survived what would be one of the coldest winters in recorded history.

 4:00 p.m. Lewis and Clark National Historical Park – Comprised of timeless rainforests and majestic coastal vistas, a rich legacy of native people and dramatic stories of America’s most famous explorers, the park allows today’s visitors to follow in the footsteps of our earliest explorers and adventure through history.

 4:30 p.m. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park – Thousands of people headed to Alaska and the Yukon Territory to fulfill their dream of riches. Today the park explores life on that 19th-century frontier and the realities faced by those who sought wealth from its resources.

5:00 p.m. Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park – Three exceptional men from Dayton, Ohio—Wilbur and Orville Wright and Paul Laurence Dunbar—found their creative outlet here through accomplishments and failures, and finally successes.

 

Sunday, October 14, 2018

12:00 p.m. Women’s Rights National Historical Park – In 1848 five women banded together to organize the first women’s rights convention. Together, they started a revolution.

12:30 p.m. New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park – Learn about the world’s preeminent whaling port of the 19th century and the communities and ships that lived and died by the sea. 

1:00 p.m. Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historical Park – Explore and honor the efforts and sacrifices of American civilians on the World War II home front. Find out how they lived, worked, and got along.

1:30 p.m. San Antonio Missions National Historical Park – After 10,000 years, the people of South Texas found their cultures and their very lives under attack. In the early 1700s Apache raided from the north, deadly diseases traveled from Mexico, and drought lingered. Survival lay in the missions. 

2:00 p.m. Valley Forge National Historical Park – Valley Forge was the site of the 1777-78 winter encampment of the Continental Army. The 3,500 acres of monuments, meadows, and woodlands commemorate the sacrifices and perseverance of the Revolutionary War generation.

2:30 p.m. Andersonville National Historic Site – The Camp Sumter military prison at Andersonville was one of the largest Confederate military prisons during the Civil War. Find out about the conditions prisoners experienced and how the site became a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation’s history.

3:00 p.m. Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site – Maggie Lena Walker devoted her life to civil rights, economic empowerment, and educational opportunities for Jim Crow-era African Americans and women. Today, her home is preserved as a tribute to her enduring legacy of vision, courage, and determination.

3:30 p.m. Richmond National Battlefield Park – The capital and hub of the Confederacy, the fate of Richmond would determine the fate of the American South during the Civil War. Today 13 distinct sites comprise the park, each one a reminder of a war that defined the nation.

4:00 p.m. Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site (60 min.) – The story of Brown v. Board of Education, which ended legal segregation in public schools, is one of hope and courage. The site commemorates one of the Topeka, Kansas, schools impacted by this landmark decision.

5:00 p.m. Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park – Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania—this is America’s battleground, where the Civil War roared to its bloody climax. No place more vividly reflects the war’s tragic cost in all its forms.